1. Pep Talk series: #1 James Patterson

    So Writer, you’re trying to write a novel in 30 days. Has anyone told you you’re crazy yet?

    You’re not crazy. I promise. I know because I’ve written a novel in a couple of months. And yes, I’m a human being (just ask my editor, or my wife) and I do sleep. The book even got published. So anyone who tells you it’s impossible is wrong and you should probably stop taking their advice. Unless it’s your mom. Then just stop taking her advice about writing (you should still floss once a day).

    There’s no getting around the fact that it’s hard, though, is there? By now you know that better than anyone. Maybe you should give up on this whole novel business and go relax. Or work at a paying job. But I say, keep at it. Because, like I said, it’s possible. And as you must suspect, it’s a pretty fantastic feeling to have written a book.

    So how do you do it? Here are some tips on making it to December 1 without going crazy or giving up. (Though if you have to do one of them, I’ve always found sanity overrated.)

    Outline. If you already have: gold star; proceed to the next piece of advice. If you didn’t, don’t worry, because it’s never too late to go back and make an outline. An outline isn’t something to be scared of, it’s just a chapter-by-chapter description of the scenes that, lined-up together, make your book. On the count of three, tell me the story that unfolds in your novel. All the way to the last chapter. Now write that down. There’s your outline. Easy, right?

    Lie to yourself. Honesty is a great quality, but we’re writing fiction here, so you’d better get used to a little light lying. Tell yourself you can do this. Tell yourself your book will be great. The world will love it and you’ll be the next J.K. Rowling, J.D. Salinger, Art Spiegelman, or whatever flavor of author you hope to become.

    Get into a writing routine. Think it’s hard to write every day during NaNo? Most professional writers keep this kind of pace all year round. Holidays, birthdays, vacations—you name it, we’re writing. The trick is making writing into a daily habit. Same time. Same place. Same hot beverage of choice. Every. Single. Day. Again. And. Again.

    Don’t do it alone. If you live with somebody, tell them to be unpleasant to you if they see you doing anything else during your writing time. Buy them a water gun. If you live alone, have friends call and check on you. And if you have no friends, you will have no trouble writing a book in 30 days. What else do you have to do? (I’m not knocking friendless people. We’ve all been there.)

    Don’t stress. I don’t mean to undermine the above, but remember this is one month, not your entire writing career. Try hard, learn from it, and if you don’t get to 50,000 words, figure out what you did wrong so you can get there next time.

    Stop reading this. Start writing. Now. (Or at midnight your time.)

    James

  2. Nanowrimo Day 1

    My fellow Nanowrimo participants! This is our month and I wish to all of you the best of luck (and to me as well).

    I will be reposting my writers’ habits series during this month for motivation, as well as my favourite pep talks from the Nanowrimo website.

    Stay positive and strong. As James Patterson said, lie to yourself and pretend that your novel will change the world. Honesty is overrated anyway.

    Love,

    -K

  3. Never

     

    A promise came out of my lips
    It came straight from my heart
    While my mind is blank before them
    You left in a flash
    Leaving a hole in our reality
    I felt your departure
    A wide see away
    I still felt it
    Even many miles away
    I sensed the missing warmth
    Infront of you
    I cried, I prayed, I promised
    And my mind is still blank
    It hurts to tell your story though
    Failure is easier
    Guilt is easier
    Your absence can never be replaced
    I can never get over it
    I can never get over you
    Never…
    Never.

     

  4. Some of my #books are on the open, while the rest is still in a suitcase. And yes, that is a plastic shoe organizer :D

    Some of my #books are on the open, while the rest is still in a suitcase. And yes, that is a plastic shoe organizer :D

  5. Great meal. It’s been too long. I miss asian food. – View on Path.

    Great meal. It’s been too long. I miss asian food. – View on Path.

  6. Listening to I Will Wait by Mumford & Sons

    Great song, especially the live version. – Preview it on Path.

  7. amandaonwriting:

Literary Birthday - 8 February
Happy Birthday, Jules Verne, born 8 February 1828, died 24 March 1905
Five Quotes
We are of opinion that instead of letting books grow mouldy behind an iron grating, far from the vulgar gaze, it is better to let them wear out by being read.
Anything one man can imagine, other men can make real.
I believe cats to be spirits come to earth. A cat, I am sure, could walk on a cloud without coming through.
Science, my boy, is made up of mistakes, but they are mistakes which it is useful to make, because they lead little by little to the truth.
Well, I feel that we should always put a little art into what we do. It’s better that way.
Verne is referred to as the ‘father of science fiction’. He wrote his first novel, Five Weeks in a Balloon, at 35. He became the second most translated author on earth, writing books about innovations and technological advancements years before they were realities. His best known novels are Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, Journey to the Centre of the Earth, and Around the World in Eighty Days.

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

    amandaonwriting:

    Literary Birthday - 8 February

    Happy Birthday, Jules Verne, born 8 February 1828, died 24 March 1905

    Five Quotes

    1. We are of opinion that instead of letting books grow mouldy behind an iron grating, far from the vulgar gaze, it is better to let them wear out by being read.
    2. Anything one man can imagine, other men can make real.
    3. I believe cats to be spirits come to earth. A cat, I am sure, could walk on a cloud without coming through.
    4. Science, my boy, is made up of mistakes, but they are mistakes which it is useful to make, because they lead little by little to the truth.
    5. Well, I feel that we should always put a little art into what we do. It’s better that way.

    Verne is referred to as the ‘father of science fiction’. He wrote his first novel, Five Weeks in a Balloon, at 35. He became the second most translated author on earth, writing books about innovations and technological advancements years before they were realities. His best known novels are Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, Journey to the Centre of the Earth, and Around the World in Eighty Days.

    by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

  8. cajunmama:

typewriter love. (by beth retro)

    cajunmama:

    typewriter love. (by beth retro)

  9. "There is a common belief that because most of us are literate and fluent, there is no need to serve an apprenticeship if we want to become a successful wordsmith. … That’s what I thought until I tried to write my first novel. I soon learnt that a novel, like a piece of furniture, has its own set of requirements, laws of construction that have to be learnt. Just because I had read plenty of novels didn’t mean I could write one, any more than I could make a chair because I had sat on enough of them."
    Nigel Watts

About me

Exploring the magical world of books. Writing, reading and everything in between.

 brave soul (s) experiencing



  1. Writers' habit series
  2. My poetry

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